Demos

 

The following songs are from the sold-out Wave concert at the GigSpace Performance Studio in Ottawa on Saturday May 9, 2015.

Manha de Carnaval


vocals – Jerry Sociedade
alto sax – David Glover
piano – Ginny Simonds
bass – Chris Thompson
drums – Lu Frattaroli

Manha de Carnaval, by Luiz Bonfa, literally means morning of Carnaval in Rio. It was one of the songs in the 1959 movie Black Orpheus. The English title is A Day in the Life of a Fool.

The less privileged Brazilians live in favelas (slums) and are the majority of those who take part in the samba parades. They look forward to Carnaval all year. It is a long period of anticipation but only a brief moment of happiness. The joy of Carnaval and the sadness of a hard life are interwoven into the fabric of the song by using major and minor chords. This technique is also used in sambas such as A Felicidade, which was also in Black Orpheus.

Triste


vocals – Jerry Sociedade
alto sax – David Glover
piano – Ginny Simonds
bass – Chris Thompson
drums – Lu Frattaroli
One of our favourite Antonio Carlos Jobim tunes, Triste (Sad) was included on his 1967 album Wave and also on his 1974 album with Elis Regina.

Influencia Do Jazz


vocals – Jerry Sociedade
piano – Ginny Simonds
bass – Chris Thompson
drums – Lu Frattaroli

Influencia Do Jazz is one of our favourite Brazilian songs written by Carlos Lyra. It is a tongue-in-cheek song about the influence of American jazz on Brazilian samba. Poor little samba got all confused with the arrival of jazz and almost disappeared. It had to return to the favelas to find its way again.

Crickets For Anamaria


vocals – Jerry Sociedade
piano – Ginny Simonds
bass – Chris Thompson
drums – Lu Frattaroli
Brazilian percussion – Regina Teixeira

This song is by Marcos Valle, a singer/composer from Rio who also wrote Samba De Verao (aka Summer Samba, aka So Nice). Marcos did a wonderful album recently with Stacey Kent which includes this song. Wave’s version features Lu Frattaroli’s amazing extended drum solo, with accompaniment by Regina Teixeira on tamborim, pandeiro, and apito (whistle).